robots

Analysis: A Westworld Podcast – Episode 2

Analysis: A Westworld Podcast – Episode 2
Analysis: A Westworld Podcast

 
 
00:00 / 1:07
 
1X
 

Jordan and Jeremy are back to discuss another episode of Westworld Season 2, this week it’s episode 2: Reunion. William has a secret. Dolores knows that secret. Which of them will reach the promised land first and either stop Westworld for good or release the Pandora’s Box of robot cowboys on an unsuspecting world?

A big topic this week is the end of a Westworld host’s narrative and how it parallels our experiences with open role-playing video games like Fallout or Skyrim.

In our now wildly successful recurring feature, Wild Speculation Corner, we ask the real question that needs asked: Is Ford some kind of crazy space man?

Sign-up for our weekly newsletter! Head over to heroespodcasts.com/newsletter to sign-up today.

Also, stop by our Patreon to see what kinds of cool perks you can get for being one of our contributors: patreon.com/HeroesPodcasts.

Not looking for a long-term commitment? No problem. Every dollar truly helps, so buy us a coffee over at ko-fi.com/heroespodcasts!

Podcast Credits

A Heroes Podcast Network Production

Hosts
Jeremy Monken
Jordan Baranowski

Editor
Jeremy Monken

Executive Producer
Derreck Mayer

Google Play Link
https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Iut3ribrwb6nbklujy2r45o4pjy

iTunes Link
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/analysis-a-westworld-podcast/id1378642225

RSS Feed Link
http://heroespodcasts.com/feed/podcast/analysiswestworld

Social Media
@HeroesPodcasts
@ZenMonken
@Jordality

Analysis: A Westworld Podcast – Episode 2

Analysis: A Westworld Podcast – Episode 1

Welcome to Westworld! Everyone’s favorite robot amusement park show is back for season 2 on HBO. The violent delights are starting back up and we’re here to talk about them. Your hosts Jeremy and Jordan break down the episodes, tie in robot revelations to previous episodes or speculate wildly on what it all means.

This week, we’re talking about Journey Into Night. What is Dolores becoming? What is happening to Bernard? Where is Maeve going? What is Teddy’s fate?

This is a limited series, so there will only be as many episodes as episodes of Westworld.

Sign-up for our weekly newsletter! Head over to heroespodcasts.com/newsletter to sign-up today.

Also, stop by our Patreon to see what kinds of cool perks you can get for being one of our contributors: patreon.com/HeroesPodcasts.

Not looking for a long-term commitment? No problem. Every dollar truly helps, so buy us a coffee over at ko-fi.com/heroespodcasts!

Podcast Credits

A Heroes Podcast Network Production

Hosts
Jeremy Monken
Jordan Baranowski

Editor
Jeremy Monken

Executive Producer
Derreck Mayer

Google Play Link
https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Iut3ribrwb6nbklujy2r45o4pjy

iTunes Link
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/analysis-a-westworld-podcast/id1378642225

RSS Feed Link
http://heroespodcasts.com/feed/podcast/analysiswestworld

Social Media
@HeroesPodcasts
@ZenMonken
@Jordality

Analysis: A Westworld Podcast – Episode 1

SH S5E09: Best Robots in TV & Film

Robots have been a part of movies, TV, and video games for something like 90 years. This week, we talk about our favorites and some of the most important across the decades from the big to small screens. Sure, we talk Star Wars, Transformers, and Terminator, but we also dive into some deep cuts you probably won’t expect.

What are your favorite robots? Did we miss anything? What would your list look like?

Comment below or hit us up @HeroesPodcasts on Twitter or Facebook!

Join us live on Tuesday nights and catch the episodes later on iTunes, Blog Talk Radio, Spreaker, Google Play, and more!

Go to Screen-Heroes.com right now to subscribe to us on iTunes and drop us a review. If you do, we’ll be sure to give you a shout-out in a future episode!

Want to join the conversation? Join us live every Tuesday night at 9PM EST on Twitch to chat with us! We’ll answer questions and note comments live on the broadcast! Follow at: twitch.tv/heroespodcasts

Subscribe to Screen Heroes! The links to iTunes, Blog Talk Radio, Spreaker, Google Play, and Feedburner are below!

Stop by our Patreon to see what kinds of cool perks you can get for being one of our contributors: patreon.com/HeroesPodcasts

Prefer to watch Screen Heroes? Catch the recorded broadcast below!

Screen Heroes Podcast Credits

A Heroes Podcast Network Production

Hosts
Derreck Mayer
Rachel Stewart
Ryan Couture

Special Guest
Jordan Seper

Executive Producer & Editor
Derreck Mayer

Music
Flying Killer Robots

iTunes Subscription Link
Screen-Heroes.com

Blog Talk Radio
http://www.blogtalkradio.com/screenheroes

Spreaker
https://www.spreaker.com/show/screen-heroes

Google Play Subscription Link
https://play.google.com/music/listen#/ps/Iwvfusxqyignwamadhc3viav4qy

Feedburner Subscription Link
http://feeds.feedburner.com/griddaily/screenheroes

RSS Feed Link
http://heroespodcasts.com/feed/podcast/screenheroes

Social Media
@HeroesPodcasts

SH S5E09: Best Robots in TV & Film

Positronic and Bicentennial Man – Retro Review

Isaac Asimov’s robot stories have always been a major influence to my writing. So, when I found one I had not read, I thought I’d pick it up. In the 1970s, Isaac Asimov wrote a novella called The Bicentennial Man. The basis of that story was about a robot who wants to become human. In the 1990s, Asimov and Robert Silverberg wrote an expanded The Bicentennial Man into a novel called The Positronic Man. The basis of these two works serve as the source material for the 1999 Robin Williams movie Bicentennial Man. This review will look at The Positronic Man and the Bicentennial Man movie.

The Novel

The Positronic ManThe Positronic Man takes place in Isaac Asimov’s robot universe. All robots are governed by the three laws, laws that cannot be overridden:

Law One: A robot cannot harm a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
Law Two: A robot must obey all orders from a human unless such orders conflict with the first law.
Law Three: A robot must preserve its existence, unless such preservation conflicts with the first or second laws.

Robots are common in this world but also mistrusted and looked down upon because it is feared that they will eventually take over the work force. This makes it hard for the U.S. Robots and Mechanical Men to manufacture and sell their products. As a gesture of good faith, a well known government official, Gerald Martin, takes in a NDR robot. The robot, affectionately named Andrew (N-D-R. aNDRew. Get it?) by Martin’s youngest daughter.

Andrew displays traits that are not common for a typical robot. First, he shows creativity by becoming a master woodcarver. But it doesn’t stop there. As his master starts to become very old, Andrew asks him to grant his freedom. Through a series of legislative acts, Andrew is eventually granted his freedom, becoming the first and only free robot. But Andrew desires more. He is never content with being a robot. His endgame is to actually become a human, complete with all of the imperfections and disadvantages associated with it.

The novel is well written, complete with all of the complexity and charm of an Isaac Asimov book. But as you experience the life of Andrew Martin, you are constantly asked the question, what makes a human being? By the end of the book, that question is answered in a profound and impactful way.

The Movie

Bicentennial ManThe Bicentennial Man movie roughly follows the plot of the novel. However, it makes several changes that honestly do not make sense. The biggest change was adding a love story element. I suppose that this adds motivation to Andrew wanting to become more human. However, he wanted to become a human long before he met the girl. The romance felt out of place, especially since it did not occur until relatively late in the film.

The movie is also too small scale. For example, Gerald Martin flat out grants Andrew his freedom without even bothering to go through the legal process. It makes very little sense. What happens to Andrew after Martin dies? A simple piece of paper would not suffice. Rather, the law would need to officially recognize Andrew’s freedom. This was very well-thought out in the book but horribly overlooked in the movie.

But then there are all of the technical problems with this movie. For example, why does Andrew seem very clumsy and has a tendency to break things when he is supposed to be good at carving wood? But one of the biggest technical problems of all is when a robot is told to turn off a human’s life support system. A robot could not do that because that would VIOLATE THE FIRST LAW!

The last major problem was the problem of the movie itself. It was made in the time where movies tried to get PG ratings so they could convince families to go see them. However, Bicentennial Man is far from a family film. And the changes to the story, especially the addition of the romantic elements, definitely make it a bad movie for a family outing. Along with trying to be a family movie, it also attempts to be a comedy. Although comedic elements are welcome, they feel wedged in and out of place. All of these factors make for a very lackluster movie with very little feeling.

Conclusion

There is honestly no comparison. The novel is far better than the movie. The characters and people Andrew befriend in the book are interesting and rounded. It’s very disheartening as Andrew watches them grow old and eventually die. The movie touched on this point, but left out some of the cool characters in favor of the love story. If you are looking for a good movie to watch in Isaac Asimov’s universe, look no further than I, Robot.

Have you read the book or seen the movie? Comment with your thoughts.

Positronic and Bicentennial Man – Retro Review