Pixar

Box Office Numbers: Aug 7-9, 2015

The latest box office numbers are in and surprise! Fantastic Four did not do well. Have you heard that enough? Well, it’s true, sad or not. The latest Fox Marvel superhero flick pulled in just over $26 million, falling short of Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation which was in its second weekend. Pixar’s Inside Out and Universal’s Jurassic World finally dropped from the top 10 after eight and nine weeks at the box office, respectively. Meanwhile, the limited release film, The Gift (2015) averaged more than Fantastic Four and almost as much as MIssion: Impossible – Rogue Nation on a per theater basis and more than doubled its small $5 million budget. Shaun the Sheep Movie, which came out this weekend, didn’t even crack the top ten, bringing in just $4 million and averaging less per theater than Inside Out and just slightly more than Jurassic World. Check out this week’s top 10 box office films below and let us know if you were one of the few to go see Fantastic Four. 

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Box Office Top 10 – August 7-9, 2015

  1. Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation ($29.4 million in its second weekend, totaling $108.654 million)
  2. Fantastic Four ($26.2 million in opening weekend across 3,995 theaters)
  3. The Gift (2015) ($12.007 million in opening weekend across 1,648 theaters)
  4. Vacation ($9.145 million in second weekend, totaling $37.325 million)
  5. Ant-Man ($7.826 million in fourth weekend, totaling $147.436 million)
  6. Minions ($7.4 million in fifth weekend, totaling $302.754 million)
  7. Ricki and the Flash ($7 million in opening weekend across 1,603 theaters)
  8. Trainwreck ($6.3 million in fourth weekend, totaling $91.102 million)
  9. Pixels ($5.43 million in third weekend, totaling $57.645 million)
  10. Southpaw ($4.764 million in third weekend, totaling $40.726 million)

What did you see this weekend? Comment below!

Box Office numbers provided by Box Office Mojo.

Box Office Numbers: Aug 7-9, 2015

Box Office Numbers: July 3-5, 2015

Two new movies, expected to be major summer hits, sputtered in their opening box office weekend. Terminator: Genisys and Magic Mike XXL missed expectations, big time. In fact, Magic Mike XXL barely beat out Ted 2 which is in its second week while the box office winners were Jurassic World, which is now at $558.14 million domestically and Pixar’s emotional masterpiece, Inside Out.

Terminator Genisys was crushed by the previous franchise film, Terminator: Salvation which made $65.32 million in it’s 5-day total, over $20 million more than the new movie. Check out the list below and click on the links to see reviews for films. The original Magic Mike, meanwhile, made $49.62 million in its 5-day while the sequel pulled in just under $27 million.

 

  1. Jurassic World ($30.9 million in 4th week, $558.14 million total)
  2. Inside Out ($30.105 million in 3rd week, $246.16 million total)
  3. Terminator: Genisys ($28.7 million in opening weekend, $44.156 million in 5-day opening)
  4. Magic Mike XXL ($11.6 million in opening weekend, $26.66 million in 5-day opening)
  5. Ted 2 ($11.6 million in 2nd week)

The top 10 is rounded out by Max (2015), Spy, San Andreas, and Me and Earl and the Dying Girl with Mad Max: Fury Road (8th week) and Avengers: Age of Ultron (10th week) finally dropping out of the list. Insidious Chapter 3 also dropped out of the top 10 after just 5 weeks.

Coming Soon:

Minions 7/10
Ant-Man 7/17
Mr. Holmes 7/24
Pixels 7/24
Southpaw 7/24

Box Office Numbers: July 3-5, 2015

Box Office Numbers: June 19-21 2015

Another big weekend at the box office thanks to Pixar’s new film, Inside Out, and an incredible second weekend by Universal Studios sequel, Jurassic World, which is on pace to being the fastest movie to gross $1 billion world wide. Inside Out, while Pixar’s first film not to debut #1 at the domestic box office had the highest opening weekend ever for an original film (meaning non-sequels, prequels, reboots, or based on existing material like books). The film also had Pixar’s second best opening weekend ever with Toy Story 3 still holding the top spot.

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Jurassic World $102 million (down 51% in second week, total domestic gross at $398.2 million)
  2. Inside Out $91.06 million across 3,946 theaters domestically opening weekend
  3. Spy $10.5 million (down 32.8% from last week, in its third week, total domestic gross at $74.8 million)
  4. San Andreas $8.24 million (down 23.8% from last week, in its fourth week, total domestic gross at $132.23 million)
  5. Dope $6.018 million across 2,002 theaters domestically opening weekend
  6. Insidious Chapter 3 $4.11 million (total domestic $45.37 million)
  7. Pitch Perfect 2 $3.3 million (total domestic $177.5 million)
  8. Mad Max: Fury Road $2.815 million (total domestic $143.602 million)
  9. Avengers: Age of Ultron $2.723 million (total domestic $451.04 million)
  10. Tomorrowland $2.009 million (total domestic $87.7 million)

Coming out Soon

  • Ted 2 – June 26th
  • Magic Mike XXL – July 1st
  • Terminator: Genisys – July 1st

Updated 06-22-15 3:51PM CST: Jurassic World will pass $1 billion globally today, four days faster than the previous record holder, Furious 7.

Box Office Numbers: June 19-21 2015

Inside Out – Review

Inside Out gets it.

What does it get, you ask?

Well, it gets everything, actually.  Let me explain.

I originally went into this thinking that I was going to write a review about how important it is that female characters are presented to our child audience as complete, multi-faceted, fully capable of growing and changing.  Well, of course Inside Out provided me with that. But! Pixar rarely produces films where the main characters DON’T come equipped with such traits (I’m looking at you Cars).

What I left the movie with instead was an overwhelming sense of comfort that somewhere out there someone understood just how each one of us and all of our intricate emotional cogs work. Here’s where the spoilers come in, so I’ll just skip to the best part:  Inside Out was a fantastic film worth every penny. Take the family, whoever is your family, and see this movie this summer.

We start with Joy.  She’s the first emotion for Riley to have, which gave her the keys to the console, and the console is incredibly important to each and every person because it drives our whole air which we present ourselves.  So from the beginning of Riley, she’s driven by Joy.  Very soon after, Sadness appears, and obviously Sadness is important too, just no one can tell why. As Riley grows, they’re joined by Fear, Disgust, and Anger, helping to round out her individual emotional spectrum.

Joy & Rainbow Unicorn

Joy & Rainbow Unicorn

Riley is now 11 and she’s happy.  All of her core memories are fueled by happiness, her Personality Islands of Family, Friendship, Honesty, Hockey, and Goofball stand strong.  A proper story doesn’t move along without conflict, which is why everything and everyone is shaken by the big move from Minnesota to San Francisco.  The Emotions do their best to keep Joy at the helm, but the panic gets the best of Sadness and her well-intentioned attempts at helping end up skewing the core memories.

With the memories altered, Joy takes it upon herself to fix Riley.  She’s so focused to do so that she completely forgets the other emotions are just as invested in Riley as she is.  Sadness especially feels the need to help and with a very well done scuffle, her and Joy find themselves whisked away from headquarters to the long-term memory bank, core memories in hand.  That leaves Anger, Disgust, and Fear to run the console, making a very sensitive and irritable Riley.  She loses interest in hockey, she skips school, and eventually, those three emotions convince her run away, back to Minnesota.

Joy & Sadness

Joy & Sadness

All this time Riley is going through the most troubling period of her life (remember she’s only 11), Joy and Sadness are on their own odyssey back to headquarters.  The emotional turmoil is causing literal damage to Riley’s psyche, making navigation of the brain an even more daunting task.  Bing Bong, an imaginary friend that’s mostly cotton candy, teams up with them so that he can be remembered and the two can continue on their adventures together.

They make it through Abstract Thought where they almost get broken down into the most basic of concepts that almost destroyed them. They traverse Imagination Land and meet Riley’s new boyfriend, who’s from Canada.  Joy, Sadness, and Bing Bong end up coming across Dream Productions, the Subconscious (it’s a prison for all the troublemakers), and the Memory Dump (the place where we forget).  Those emotions would have done anything to protect their Riley, and that was sure put to the test.

Bing Bong

Bing Bong

Inside Out is one of Pixar’s best, which is more than evident while watching the film.  Every casting choice was spot on.  Every scene was beautifully animated. Every moment was entertaining. But the moral focus found at the center of the film may just be the most important concept Pixar has conveyed yet: Sadness is special.  That’s a huge realization that we often don’t want to admit to ourselves, especially when we’re children.  Yet the truth remains that Sadness is necessary. Sadness makes us feel something at times when we would much rather feel nothing.   We are able to pull ourselves out of the darkest hours of our lives because of Sadness.  The other emotions inside us will do everything they can to fight it; they don’t want us sad either.  The fact that Pixar managed to grasp one of the most intense and complicated lies we as humans tell ourselves as well as unravel it before our eyes in only 102 minutes shows just how high the standard is for not only children’s films, but films altogether.

I’ve seen a lot of movies this summer, this year.  I’m going to see a ton more.  It’s what I do. This movie is by far the most important one out there now.  It’s these emotional affectations that keep Pixar at the top.  They refuse to ever dumb down a movie for children, knowing well enough that everyone, young and old, can relate to the tales they tell.  If their beautiful interpretation of the human mind doesn’t leave you cinematically fulfilled by the ending, I’m not entirely convinced that anything ever could.

 

Inside Out – Review